The Trend of Google Analytics

8 12 2017

By Allie Weitekamp (@weitekamp_allie)

In the Journalism Department, one of the major tools professors are discussing in classes is Google Analytics. Google Analytics is a tool to study how users are interacting with web pages and blogs. It also helps measure advertising ROI, track Flash, video and social networking sites.

Google states, “Google Analytics makes it easy to keep track of your customer’s journey by connecting customer behavior, channel performance, and much more across your sites and apps in robust reports and dashboards.”

The program is free to start and very easy to set up. Below is a video tutorial that gives step-by-step instructions of how to set up a Google Analytics account.

Not only is this service helpful for the average consumer, but also for businesses. Google Analytics studies exactly how users interact with their website. The tool can calculate page views, clicks, bounce rate (how fast users exit from pages), where the person is located and so much more.

Google is even able to calculate a business’ return on investment (ROI) when using Google’s other service Adwords. Through the “cost analysis” tab, Google is able to calculate the “cost per click” and return on investment. The data from the advertising campaigns is imported into the Analytics page and then Google creates dashboards and graphs depicting that information.

Since Google Analytics is such a useful feature for journalists and business, it is possible to be certified in utilizing the tool. This certification will set set students apart in a job interview because of its difficulty and practicality, especially in the workplace. The certification is provided once users go through the Google Analytics Academy, which is a series of videos. Once the videos have been watched, users will then take a 90 question exam.

Google Analytics can help increase traffic, compile data and assist with advertising campaigns. For more information about Google Analytics or how to become certified, click here.

 

 

Advertisements




Find Your Fit Within The UWO Journalism Department

4 12 2017

By: Jamie Burns (@Jamiee_Burns)

 

 

 

Have a talent for writing, a love for photography, a mind filled with creativity or just an interest in media? Then welcome to the field of journalism. At the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, there is no limit to the opportunities for students to explore. In fact, within the journalism department there are a variety of opportunities offered:

Journalism Major

Ask anyone to share thoughts on what journalism is and likely you will hear something along the lines of “reporting and writing news.” However, on top of this students with an eye for photography or desire to learn about multimedia production can fall into journalism as well. In fact, the journalism department is proposing an update for the current journalism major to become a multimedia journalism major. This would merge together two emphases — visual journalism and writing/editing.

Dr. Tim Gleason, journalism professor and acting director of the Interactive Web Management program, explains, “News media professionals need a variety of skills, which are those offered in the two emphases. It made sense to combine these two emphases so students will have the same baseline of writing, editing, video and visual design training.”

So if you aspire to be a big-time reporter or perhaps a digital content writer, this is right up your alley. Students take classes such as Advanced Reporting or Feature Writing where they gain hands-on experience in gathering, interviewing and writing content. In addition to this, you will get to practice photography, learn relevant software programs and have access to digital imaging equipment. You also get to create and manipulate elements such as visuals, sound, video and text. Rather than the usual lecture, immerse yourself in hands-on use of technology.

Public Relations Major

UWO was the first university in the UW System to introduce a public relations major. Within this major, students learn how to tell the story of a brand/company through the creation of press releases, media pitches, events or blog posts. You also get to work with actual clients to help them interact with key audiences through internal, external or corporate communication tactics. Classes include PR Techniques and Case Studies in Public Relations. Also, if you ever wondered what it was like in crisis situations, this major allows a hands-on experience in dealing with crisis communication and learning how to help an organization maintain honest and strong relationships with the public.

Advertising Emphasis

If you’re a creative thinker, enjoy building promotional content or imagine what it would be like working at an ad agency, then advertising might be your calling. Acquire skills in copywriting or ad production and become proficient in different computer software such as Adobe InDesign and Photoshop. Classes like Advertising Copy, Layout and Production teach the design side, while Advertising Media helps students learn how to select the right media for different target audiences. Students get the opportunity to compete nationally in Strategic Campaigns in advertising by working as an agency team and developing an integrated advertising plan for a real client that gets pitched to industry judges. What better way to gain real-world experience?

Media Studies Emphasis

Another direction in journalism to pursue is the management and research side. Students will gain a deep understanding regarding the relationships among mass media, individuals and society as a whole. They will also better understand a variety of media theories such as agenda setting or cultivation theory and be challenged with the ethical problems that are faced by mass media practitioners today. Classes in this emphasis include Media and Society and Media Ethics.

If you are still unsure about which major or emphasis to pursue, comment below with any questions you may have regarding the program.





On Trend: Online Certification

1 12 2017

By Madeline Clemence (Clem__Clemence)

 

Let's Get


Online certifications seem to be all the rage right now in the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh Department of Journalism. Becoming certified in areas of social media, human subjects research, and analytics are consuming the journalism students in some areas of the department at UWO. Students can leverage these skills internally and externally to their needs as they continue in the journalism field.
Cision, HubSpot, and CITI, are only a few of the certifications getting students ready for the employment environment. Whether it is social media publishing knowledge, an addition to a LinkedIn profile or resume, these certification programs are creating well-rounded journalism students with a higher level of professionalism.

Narrowing in on HubSpot specifically, senior Jess Foster, a public relations major with a sales emphasis, states “I had never heard of Hubspot before jumping on board with the journalism department. This simple yet time-consuming certification helped me land my dream internship.”

Hubspot is an inbound marketing tool that allows employees to market products and companies effectively and efficiently using online technologies. Foster mentioned in her first interview that she was Hubspot certified and the interviewer was truly impressed. The HubSpot certification definitely did not go unnoticed as it helped her stand out.

Similar to HubSpot in ways that the program allows individuals to use and analyze social media, Cision is another program journalism students are working on to strengthen their creative social presence. According to the official Cision website, “[Cision] is a leading global public relations and earned media software company and services provider” that breaks down “rich analytics and in-depth communication insights.” Understanding where technical and strategic aspects of social media come together is the beauty of the certification course.

“At the moment, I am going through two more certifications in my journalism courses. Each certification I achieve is unique in its own way and I know will benefit me in the future,” Foster said. She is finding time to get certified in order to practice the skills and techniques before using them in the real world. She, along with many other journalism students, are excited to graduate and stand out in the job market.





Public Relations: Recertified!

22 11 2017

By Alicia Kahl (@kahlmealicia)

CEPR

The Department of Journalism’s public relations major recently received re-certification from the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) for the Certification in Education for Public Relations (CEPR). The University of Wisconsin Oshkosh, which was originally certified in 2011, is one of only 39 undergraduate universities in the nation with this distinction.

The CEPR demonstrates a level of excellence in education and professional outcomes for students in public relations. Department Chair Sara Hansen, who authored the CEPR application, noted the quality-assurance assessments and reviews that led to the recognition for our program.

When asked about the value of the CEPR to students, Hansen said the certification indicates students will receive an exceptional education in public relations.

The CEPR is a quality stamp from the highest level of public relations practice through the PRSA,” Hansen said. “It demonstrates the rigor of our program to provide a high-quality education that prepares students to succeed in the field.”

The process is rigorous and lengthy, and is conducted every six years. It includes meeting eight standards: curriculum, faculty, resources and facilities, students, assessment, professional affiliations, relationships with total unit and university and diversity and global perspectives. Universities are evaluated on the ability to exceptionally meet the requirements via the application, as well as an on-site visit from two to three APR-certified professionals.

Hansen submitted the certification application in February with extensive data about the program’s courses, integration with the professional PR community, successes of alumni and other key factors for the eight standards. In April, two reviewers made an on-site evaluation of the program, which included meeting with faculty and local PRSA members, observing classes and engaging with students.  

“The reviewers’ report noted our strengths, such as well-prepared students, positive and personal relationships with faculty and a curriculum that keeps pace with technology and the industry,” Hansen said. “The report also helps us see areas where we can improve to keep advancing our program.”

Public Relations Professor Kristine Nicolini, who helped with the application process, noted the worthwhile investment for re-certification. She received the official recognition of certification at the 2017 PRSA International Conference in October in Boston.

The CEPR is indicative of a high-quality program aligned with PRSA standards,” Nicolini said. “We are the only school in Wisconsin to hold this certification, and we are very proud of it.”

 

 





On the Scene with Interns: Wisconsin Herd

6 11 2017

By Monica Salmeri @MonicaSalmeri

Eighty-seven percent of students in the journalism department complete one or more internships before they graduate. Many of our students have interned locally, throughout the nation and remotely. Currently, several of our students are interning throughout Wisconsin. Two of our students were recently hired for the highly competitive public relations internship at the Wisconsin Herd, the new G-league NBA Basketball team in Oshkosh.

Seniors Katie Biersach and Alicia Kahl were selected from a large pool of candidates to serve as interns during the inaugural season for the Herd. As interns they are tasked with a variety of jobs including writing content for the Herd’s game-day program, media guide and social media. They also research statistics, compile player biographies and draft copy for donation request emails. On game days the two will be the go-to people for the media that are in attendance, making sure they are equipped with information, statistics and equipment needs.

FullSizeRender-1“I love seeing how excited the community is for this inaugural season, and I think it will be a fantastic opportunity to bring people together,” Biersach said.

Kahl says that she wanted an internship with the Herd ever since the team announced that there was going to be a developmental league team in Wisconsin.

“I knew this is what I wanted from the beginning and patiently waited for the internship to be announced,” Kahl said. “I checked Handshake every single day until they showed up. On the same day the internships were posted, I polished my resume, wrote a cover letter and spent hours updating my website/online portfolio.”

While preparation and qualifications are important to getting hired, passion is also a key component. We are proud to have such passionate individuals in our department. Go Herd!

Advice from the interns:

Alicia:

If you are seeking an internship that you really want, don’t be afraid to find the key, management staff within that organization and just inquire about a potential internship. They may not be looking for interns at that exact moment, but by you reaching out and getting your name out there, that could potentially put you ahead of all future applicants.

Do your research, be prepared and feel in your heart that it is a position you truly want to pursue. You want to be able to showcase how passionate you are about the position and how unique and dedicated you are.

Katie:

Internships are extremely important in a student’s college career. Internships can help you figure out where your passions lie and where they do not. All of my internships have provided me with countless ways to expand my skillset and give me a glimpse into the real world.

I would always recommend students get an internship, maybe even more than one, and when they do, to take advantage of every learning opportunity within the internship.

 





Biersach Runs for National PRSSA Committee, Increases Awareness of UWO

1 05 2017

Brianna Colebourne By Brianna Colebourne

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh journalism student Katie Biersach ran for a National PRSSA committee position and increased awareness of the UW Oshkosh Public Relations Student Society of America chapter and the journalism department as a whole.

Katie Biersach image

Katie Biersach

Biersach, a junior majoring in public relations with a minor in Radio-TV-Film, traveled to Seattle from March 30- April 2 to run for the vice president of career services position, which entails managing the PRSSA Internship Center, planning events for Career Development Month, increasing champions for PRSSA’s presence in the society, and much more.

In the end, she did not receive the position, but it was an extremely valuable experience. She even ended up running for another position off the floor, which she had not prepared for at all. Biersach said, “I put my professional skills to the test and proved to myself that I can do anything I set my mind to.”

Running for those positions meant so much more than the position itself to Biersach. She used it as a way to gain experience, raise awareness about the UW Oshkosh journalism department, showcase her skills, and spread her knowledge to inspire and lead students from all across the world because she truly admires PRSSA.

Sara Steffes Hansen, faculty adviser of the Dr. Julie Henderson PRSSA chapter, helped Biersach prepare for her presentation by listening to her speech and providing constructive feedback. Hansen said: “It is quite an accomplishment for Katie to be a finalist for a National PRSSA position among a highly qualified field of candidates. We are very proud of her for reaching this level, and further putting UWO and the Department of Journalism on the national stage.”

Biersach, who will graduate in May 2018, is president of the UW Oshkosh PRSSA chapter and has served on its executive board for two years. Biersach also will be the 2017-2018 Promotions Director for Titan TV and is currently a part of Reeve Union Board.

In the past, she was a news reporter for the Advance-Titan, the communications director for Fletcher Hall Government, production member for Titan TV and a news reporter on 90.3 WRST.

 

 





Making the most of advising…

19 02 2016

By Catie Schultz (@CatieSchultz17)

When you are in college, one of the most stressful decisions to make is deciding which classes to take. You want classes that are interesting and that fit well within your major/minor.

When you look at the process as a whole, it can seem overwhelming and daunting. Fortunately, the UW Oshkosh Journalism Department has great faculty advisers who are willing to help you when choosing your classes.

As a non-traditional transfer student, I was worried about the advising process. I had no clue where to start. Luckily, my journalism advising experience has been painless. I worked one-on-one with my adviser who answered my questions and concerns. A plan was laid out that was beneficial to me based on where I was academically.

Laurin Krekling, a Journalism (Advertising) and Public Relations major, shared her experiences with advising. “As a traditional undergraduate student who has changed my major more than once, I have learned to appreciate how helpful the Journalism Department’s advising sessions are.  This last semester was my first time advising with the faculty, and it helped me a lot. I was able to sit down and personally talk with the adviser one-on-one. I think it helped out a lot that these advisers also taught some of the classes I was going to be in and gave me more of an up-close view,” Krekling said.

The advisers are here to help you complete the program as soon as possible, excel in the journalism program as well as take the best classes that will be beneficial for you and your future career goals.

“They were also very helpful in making sure I graduate as fast as possible. They were able to lay out the rest of my classes for me so I could visually see what the rest of my years here at the university looked like. I think that every student needs to take advantage of this because they can help you from the simple things of picking out classes, to helping you choose your emphasis and even show you internship opportunities,” Krekling said.

Here are some things to remember that will help you with the advising process.

  1. Sign up for the appropriate time and do it early–Signup for advising appointments starts next week. The sign-up sheets are posted outside of each journalism adviser’s office. Journalism classes fill up quickly, so the earlier you see your adviser, the better chance you have of getting into the classes that you need.

Note: Make sure you come early! Students will only have 15 minutes to meet with their advisor, so if you are late, you will lose part of your appointment time.

  1. Come prepared–Bring your current STAR report and come with a general idea of the classes you are interested in taking or have questions about.

Cindy Schultz has sent out an email that gives detailed information about the registration process. Please read the information carefully so you have a stress-free advising experience. For more information on journalism courses that are offered, see the curriculum worksheet.

Happy advising week!