Biersach Runs for National PRSSA Committee, Increases Awareness of UWO

1 05 2017

Brianna Colebourne By Brianna Colebourne

University of Wisconsin Oshkosh journalism student Katie Biersach ran for a National PRSSA committee position and increased awareness of the UW Oshkosh Public Relations Student Society of America chapter and the journalism department as a whole.

Katie Biersach image

Katie Biersach

Biersach, a junior majoring in public relations with a minor in Radio-TV-Film, traveled to Seattle from March 30- April 2 to run for the vice president of career services position, which entails managing the PRSSA Internship Center, planning events for Career Development Month, increasing champions for PRSSA’s presence in the society, and much more.

In the end, she did not receive the position, but it was an extremely valuable experience. She even ended up running for another position off the floor, which she had not prepared for at all. Biersach said, “I put my professional skills to the test and proved to myself that I can do anything I set my mind to.”

Running for those positions meant so much more than the position itself to Biersach. She used it as a way to gain experience, raise awareness about the UW Oshkosh journalism department, showcase her skills, and spread her knowledge to inspire and lead students from all across the world because she truly admires PRSSA.

Sara Steffes Hansen, faculty adviser of the Dr. Julie Henderson PRSSA chapter, helped Biersach prepare for her presentation by listening to her speech and providing constructive feedback. Hansen said: “It is quite an accomplishment for Katie to be a finalist for a National PRSSA position among a highly qualified field of candidates. We are very proud of her for reaching this level, and further putting UWO and the Department of Journalism on the national stage.”

Biersach, who will graduate in May 2018, is president of the UW Oshkosh PRSSA chapter and has served on its executive board for two years. Biersach also will be the 2017-2018 Promotions Director for Titan TV and is currently a part of Reeve Union Board.

In the past, she was a news reporter for the Advance-Titan, the communications director for Fletcher Hall Government, production member for Titan TV and a news reporter on 90.3 WRST.

 

 

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Organ Donor Awareness Campaign Kicks off at UW Oshkosh

24 04 2017

Abby Reich  By Abby Reich @missabbyrae23

The UW Oshkosh Dr. Julie Henderson Public Relations Student Society of America chapter started its Blooming Lives campaign for the National Organ Donor Awareness Competition on April 13, and they are already “blooming with joy.”

The PRSSA chapter at Rowan University sponsors the competition. The founder of the chapter received a life-saving kidney transplant from his sister, so the chapter created the annual PRSSA competition for other chapters to gain experience in event planning and to bring awareness to organ donation.

The Oshkosh chapter has been planning its campaign since February, and their events will kick off at the end of April. Their campaign has two main components: the Blooming Lives flower drive, which will be held 10 a.m.- 3 p.m. April 27 in Reeve Memorial Union, and a campus-wide planting event on April 29.

Ashley Larson          Working on Campaign

Carissa Brzezinski, the vice president of events for UW Oshkosh’s PRSSA chapter, is leading the campaign. “This campaign is a reflection of our chapter, not just me,” she said. “I want everyone to feel involved throughout the entire process and to feel proud of all the work we have done.”

Brzezinski also came up with the concept of flowers for the campaign. When she was thinking about the campaign, she kept coming back to the idea that NODAC is always held in the spring. She said, “There’s something about the springtime and new life … and that serves organ donation and the new life that it creates, as well.” Members brainstormed the chapter’s name for the campaign, “Blooming Lives” for organ donation, during a chapter meeting.

Blooming Lives Banner

One of the great things about the flower drive is that there will be no charge for the pansies. The flowers will be free to anyone who is a registered organ donor, signs up to become an organ donor or learns more about organ donation at their booth on April 27.

According to Brzezinski, “The goal of the flower drive is to focus on the positive benefits of donation and to celebrate those who are already donors and those who want to learn more and possibly become donors.”

After the flower drive, the chapter will plant 300 pansies on campus in partnership with the university on April 27. The chapter chose orange pansies to create a visual and long-lasting awareness on campus for organ donation. Brzezinski said, “Like organ donation itself, planting these flowers not only benefits the cause, but our campus community as well.” The pansies will be planted in beds on the front side of Kolf, Horizon, Dempsey and the power plant.

The Oshkosh chapter has a long history participating in NODAC starting in 1997 when the competition began. They also have a long history of success. In the last 10 years alone, they have received two firsts, two seconds, and two honorable mentions. Its members are grateful to be able to apply the skills they have learned in the classroom with their peers and colleagues for a very worthy cause.

“Blooming Lives is an honest and genuine campaign focused on bringing even more positivity and grace to the conversation around organ donation,” Brzezinski said. The chapter’s goal is to increase awareness of organ donation, and they hope that the campus community will take part in the Blooming Lives events.

The chapter will learn the results of the competition in May. Winning chapters will be recognized and will receive their awards at the PRSSA National Conference in October 2017.





University of Wisconsin Oshkosh journalism students help local school find new look

24 04 2017

By Jean Giovanetti

Students at the University of Wisconsin Oshkosh (UWO) helped a local elementary school update its image.

finalwolf

New Logo Design

Students enrolled in the journalism department’s Advertising Copy Layout and Production class worked with representatives of Carl Traeger Elementary School to develop a new logo. The current logo features an image of a wolf, representing the school’s mascot, a timberwolf.

Brenna Garrison-Bruden, principal of Carl Traeger Elementary School, sent out a request in her newsletter asking for help updating the school’s logo, which is used on everything from print and online communications, to spirit wear.

Journalism department lecturer, Jean A. Giovanetti, answered the call.

“This was a great chance for UWO journalism students to practice their design skills with a real client, as well as help the community,” Giovanetti said. “Students get on-the-job training, while the client gets a free professional-quality design.”

After meeting the school’s principal on campus, students in the journalism class created several drafts of a logo, which Garrison-Bruden presented to a committee composed of elementary school parents and teachers. Then staff and students voted on the new logo design and chose the logo created by Emily Fredrick, a junior from Poy Sippi.

Fredrick

Emily Fredrick

“I wanted to create a friendly wolf that children will be able to look up to as their mascot,” Fredrick said. “I love promoting brands through graphic design, and this is exactly what this class allows me to do.”

“The students demonstrated a high level of engagement in getting to know the needs of our school and used this information in the design process,” said Brenna Garrison-Bruden. “Our Site Council, staff and students participated in the selection process and we couldn’t be more pleased with the results!”





Networking Your Way to Your Dream Job…

3 03 2017

By Christina Basken (@ChristinaBasken)

Networking can be an excellent way to reach out, get your name out there, land your dream job and perhaps even come across an opportunity you’ve never even thought of exploring! A few of our journalism students have had great success with networking. Read about their stories, tips and advice here.

Mackenna Erdmann, a senior at UWO studying Public Relations and Journalism

Through networking, Erdmann has had the chance to work for exciting organizations such as 95.9 Kiss FM, the Wisconsin Timber Rattlers, the Milwaukee Bucks, the Walt Disney World Company, the CMA’s and the Green Bay Packers.

“One of the experiences that changed my life in many ways was GRAMMY Camp”, Erdmann said. “My mom heard about the opportunity and we put together an audition tape to submit. After weeks of waiting, I was chosen as one of 30 kids to participate in the week long camp in New York City. I spent time with industry professionals who opened my eyes to the entertainment industry as a whole and inspired me to work hard to get where I want to be. Among those people, I met my friend Josh who happened to be from Nashville. After telling him about my passion for singing and country music, he didn’t hesitate to invite me to work the CMA Awards. A couple years later, he called me and asked if I would come down for the week of the show. Without hesitation, I packed my bags and headed to Music City. The first year, I started out driving golf carts, but as I started talking with people and ‘selling myself,’ I was eventually moved inside where I work directly with all the country artists and talent who are a part of the show both during rehearsal week and the show itself. I moved my way up and this past November, I had the honor of working with Brad Paisley. If I hadn’t expanded my network both at GRAMMY Camp and the CMA’s, I would have never gotten the opportunity to do what I am doing today.”

-Advice

“If I had to leave you with advice, it would be this: be comfortable being uncomfortable and get as much experience as you possibly can,” Erdmann said. “What I mean by ‘be comfortable being uncomfortable’ is there are going to be a lot of times where you may not feel comfortable talking to someone and trying to sell yourself. DO IT. You never know who you are talking to or where that conversation could go.”

Katie Biersach, a junior at UWO majoring in PR with a minor in RTF

Biersach has discovered many networking opportunities through PRSSA and at the National and Regional Conferences. Being a member of the chapter allows Biersach to take advantage of professional networking events and experiences with practitioners in the industry. She also has opportunities to network with students from across the world to learn about their chapters..

-Advice

“Take a leap of faith and network with professionals on LinkedIn that work for companies that you want to intern or work at in the future,” Biersach said. “Take advantage of on-campus events to network with professionals. Join a club or organization relating to your major or minor and network with students in that group. Talk to your professors and ask for advice when applying for an internship. Do not be afraid to ask someone to take a second look at your application materials. Internships will not come to you. If you want the internship bad enough, you will do everything you can to make your application the best.”

Rachel Boudreau, a recent graduate from UWO majoring in Journalism with an emphasis in public relations “– now working as a content specialist at DealerSocket

Boudreau, on the other hand, has had many networking opportunities through being involved in her sorority. Taking leadership positions has allowed her to meet and network with campus professionals, and peers from across the country at conferences. She has also had networking opportunities through professors in her journalism classes, and with her involvement with PRSSA.

“These opportunities have influenced my career path because talking to people in a new area of PR that I haven’t yet explored, or talking to other motivated students, helps me become more motivated and curious about future career opportunities,” Boudreau said. “My experiences in college have given me a drive to always push forward and to forge my own path in my career.”

-Advice

Boudreau states, “Get involved! I can’t express enough how important it is to be involved in a variety of organizations on campus, both within and outside of your major. Talk to classmates, professors, friends, family, everyone you possibly can about what you want to do with your life because you never know where an opportunity might pop up. Be open to trying new things. You might have an internship opportunity that you don’t think fits into exactly what you want to do, but never turn away an experience.”

 
Resources

How to find out about networking conferences going on around campus? Download the UWO Handshake app and get connected with clubs and organizations on campus! Also check out these great monthly networking conferences held at The Lambeau Field and Oshkosh area to interact with over 50 companies to land your dream job!

 





Using Social Media In Your Job Search

22 06 2016

By Jenna Nyberg

We’ve all Screenshot 2016-06-21 21.00.11heard it a hundred times: Be careful about what you post on your social media accounts. In this field more than most, the words you use and the habits you have on social media accounts might make or break your chance at employment. But instead of focusing on what not to do, let’s think about a few ways you can embrace social media to help score the job you want.

Know where to look.

A 2014 national survey by Jobvite found that the most popular social networks job recruiters are using to find employees are LinkedIn (94 percent), Facebook (65 percent) and Twitter (55 percent). In comparison, only 36 percent of job seekers are using LinkedIn to look for jobs. What does this mean? Get on LinkedIn! (And keep an eye out for job postings on Facebook and Twitter, too.)

Include social media links on your resume.

If this makes sense for the types of positions you’re applying for and if you feel confident about your presence on social media, go for it! Providing employers with these links will allow them to get a better idea of who you are, what your voice/writing style is like and how you interact online.

Update your profiles and settings.

According to the same Jobvite survey, 93 percent of recruiters looked at a candidate’s social profile, and 42 percent of the time the content they viewed led them to reconsider a candidate, both positively and negatively. With this in mind, think about maybe making some changes to your accounts, such as a more professional LinkedIn photo, stricter privacy settings on Facebook, appropriate and relevant tweets, etc.

Network your way into a job.

As I’m applying for jobs, I’m finding out that it really is “all about who you know.” Social media platforms are meant to help you make connections with people, so use them to your advantage. Whether it’s just letting people know you’re looking for jobs, connecting with people on LinkedIn or joining in on Twitter conversations, it’s important to get your name out there and on the radar of potential employers. When heading out on your next job hunt, keep in mind all of these ways that you can utilize social media to your advantage. It’s a great way to get ahead of the game!





Internship Spotlight: Creating Your Own Personal Brand

14 06 2016

By Catie Schultz (@CatieSchultz17)

As journalism students, we have it drilled into our heads very early in our courses how important it is to show your voice when creating content, however, it is even more imperative to focus on the creation of your own personal brand. But why is your personal brand so important? By setting the tone in creating your own personal brand, you are setting yourself apart from the competition. You also are creating better job opportunities by evolving your brand, developing better connections with people you work with as well as current and potential clients, generating industry recognition and so much more.

Hayley Rickmeier, a Public Relations and Journalism-Advertising major, wrote an internship newsletter article for Journalism 427: Professional Journalism Internship, outlining her insight on how to create your personal brand to prepare students for internships and life after graduation. Like many students, Hayley didn’t know what her personal brand was and expressed concern saying, “I am basically going to be the same as everyone else who graduates with the same degree. I don’t really know what will set me apart from them.”

To assist in trying to figure out where to start in developing your personal brand, Hayley thought of some great questions to consider. Use these questions to create responses about how you would answer. If you can answer all of these questions, you already have a great start in developing your personal brand.

  • What sets you apart from others and why are you unique?
  • What kind of situations do you excel in?
  • What area would you consider your absolute expertise?
  • What are some of your strongest personality traits?
  • What can you bring to the table in a future career of your choosing?

Another helpful way to gain insight is to ask people close to you about what you are great at. You can learn a lot about yourself by hearing what others think of your work ethic and personality. Paying attention to your social role also is helpful; an example of this would be if you are the person people always turn to for advice or for guidance during group projects, you are a natural leader.

As time goes by and you gain more experience, your personal brand will grow and change. As students, ours will be more goal-oriented until we gain professional experience, and that’s perfectly okay. Employers are looking for a brand that shows you know what you can bring to the table and that you are sure of your skills. For those of you interested in learning about how you can start your personal brand, The Complete Guide to Building Your Personal Brand has excellent information and highlights many ways you can learn how to build and expand your personal brand.

 





Journalism Student Finalists in 36th Annual Photographer’s Forum Contest

4 05 2016

By Grace Riggert (@GraceRiggert)

Six UW Oshkosh students were selected as finalists in the 36th annual Photographer’s Forum College and High School Contest.

Each of these spectacular photos will be featured along with other finalists, winners and honorable mentions in a hard cover book “Best of College & High School Photography 2016.”

36th Annual Photographers Forum Collage

Clockwise from top left: Corissa Mosher, Allison Tetrick, Katie Salzmann, Matt Schulz, Chelsea Phillips, and Emily Conlee.

 

Corissa Mosher’s photo happened to be the first photo she had taken with a camera other than her phone. The picture is of her roommate, Courtney, who appears to be “emerging out of a natural wonderland” in their backyard according to Mosher.

“In reality if the photo was shot a bit lower, you would be able to see the beer cans that have accumulated on the property throughout time,” Mosher said. “If I would have zoomed out just a smidgen, you would have noticed the fact that the natural wonderland she is standing in is really just a fat bush in our unimpressive backyard.”

Despite the less than ideal backdrop, the stunning photo was for the portrait/self-portrait assignment in Media Photo I and submitted to the contest per Dr. Tim Gleason’s suggestion.

“I got a good grade on the assignment and when I got it back, there was a note from Gleason stating something along the lines of: if you do not submit this for the Photography Forum Photo Contest, I will be very sad,” Mosher said. “So I did.”

Other snap shots were part of long-running projects like Chelsea Phillips’s photos, which is part of a series of images she is calling “Inner Demons.”

“The series shows people battling their demons,” Phillips said. “Each portrait of a person is accompanied by a photo of their addiction. The photo that I submitted is the alcohol demon. It signifies that he doesn’t want to be an alcoholic anymore but he can’t stop.”

For others they just happened to be in the right place at the right time.

“The photo I submitted I took while walking near Asylum Point Park, one of my favorite places to go in Oshkosh,” Allison Tetrick said. “I was actually there to create a video for my Journalism 340 blog and saw the butterfly on my walk back to my car.”

All of the photos submitted by our students capture unique moments in time and showcase the tremendous skill the students in our department have. Congrats to the finalists, we hope to see more of your work in the future!