Using Social Media In Your Job Search

22 06 2016

By Jenna Nyberg

We’ve all Screenshot 2016-06-21 21.00.11heard it a hundred times: Be careful about what you post on your social media accounts. In this field more than most, the words you use and the habits you have on social media accounts might make or break your chance at employment. But instead of focusing on what not to do, let’s think about a few ways you can embrace social media to help score the job you want.

Know where to look.

A 2014 national survey by Jobvite found that the most popular social networks job recruiters are using to find employees are LinkedIn (94 percent), Facebook (65 percent) and Twitter (55 percent). In comparison, only 36 percent of job seekers are using LinkedIn to look for jobs. What does this mean? Get on LinkedIn! (And keep an eye out for job postings on Facebook and Twitter, too.)

Include social media links on your resume.

If this makes sense for the types of positions you’re applying for and if you feel confident about your presence on social media, go for it! Providing employers with these links will allow them to get a better idea of who you are, what your voice/writing style is like and how you interact online.

Update your profiles and settings.

According to the same Jobvite survey, 93 percent of recruiters looked at a candidate’s social profile, and 42 percent of the time the content they viewed led them to reconsider a candidate, both positively and negatively. With this in mind, think about maybe making some changes to your accounts, such as a more professional LinkedIn photo, stricter privacy settings on Facebook, appropriate and relevant tweets, etc.

Network your way into a job.

As I’m applying for jobs, I’m finding out that it really is “all about who you know.” Social media platforms are meant to help you make connections with people, so use them to your advantage. Whether it’s just letting people know you’re looking for jobs, connecting with people on LinkedIn or joining in on Twitter conversations, it’s important to get your name out there and on the radar of potential employers. When heading out on your next job hunt, keep in mind all of these ways that you can utilize social media to your advantage. It’s a great way to get ahead of the game!





Internship Spotlight: Creating Your Own Personal Brand

14 06 2016

By Catie Schultz (@CatieSchultz17)

As journalism students, we have it drilled into our heads very early in our courses how important it is to show your voice when creating content, however, it is even more imperative to focus on the creation of your own personal brand. But why is your personal brand so important? By setting the tone in creating your own personal brand, you are setting yourself apart from the competition. You also are creating better job opportunities by evolving your brand, developing better connections with people you work with as well as current and potential clients, generating industry recognition and so much more.

Hayley Rickmeier, a Public Relations and Journalism-Advertising major, wrote an internship newsletter article for Journalism 427: Professional Journalism Internship, outlining her insight on how to create your personal brand to prepare students for internships and life after graduation. Like many students, Hayley didn’t know what her personal brand was and expressed concern saying, “I am basically going to be the same as everyone else who graduates with the same degree. I don’t really know what will set me apart from them.”

To assist in trying to figure out where to start in developing your personal brand, Hayley thought of some great questions to consider. Use these questions to create responses about how you would answer. If you can answer all of these questions, you already have a great start in developing your personal brand.

  • What sets you apart from others and why are you unique?
  • What kind of situations do you excel in?
  • What area would you consider your absolute expertise?
  • What are some of your strongest personality traits?
  • What can you bring to the table in a future career of your choosing?

Another helpful way to gain insight is to ask people close to you about what you are great at. You can learn a lot about yourself by hearing what others think of your work ethic and personality. Paying attention to your social role also is helpful; an example of this would be if you are the person people always turn to for advice or for guidance during group projects, you are a natural leader.

As time goes by and you gain more experience, your personal brand will grow and change. As students, ours will be more goal-oriented until we gain professional experience, and that’s perfectly okay. Employers are looking for a brand that shows you know what you can bring to the table and that you are sure of your skills. For those of you interested in learning about how you can start your personal brand, The Complete Guide to Building Your Personal Brand has excellent information and highlights many ways you can learn how to build and expand your personal brand.

 





The Department of Journalism Passes Accreditation

2 06 2016

By Catie Schultz (@CatieSchultz17)

The Department of Journalism completed an approximately two-year writing and review process to become reaccredited after earning unanimous votes from the members of the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC).

The department wrote the self-study report during 2014-2015, was visited by a site team in October 2015 and received support from the ACEJMC Committee in March 2016 and the Council in May 2016. The department’s journalism and public relations majors are accredited for the maximum six upcoming years.

The department was evaluated on nine standards:

  1. Mission, Governance and Administration
  2. Curriculum and Instruction
  3. Diversity and Inclusiveness
  4. Full-Time and Part-Time Faculty
  5. Scholarship: Research, Creative and Professional Activity
  6. Student Services
  7. Resources, Facilities and Equipment
  8. Professional and Public Service
  9. Assessment of Learning Outcomes

    Accreditation

    A congratulatory letter to finalize accreditation

Accreditation is beneficial for the department, students and the university. The department has higher standards that it must meet compared to non-accredited programs.

Students benefit from accreditation by the rigorous course-work, hands-on work with faculty and updated technology available to them.

Department Chairperson Timothy Gleason said, “A program doesn’t receive reaccreditation like someone gets a token birthday cake. It is earned through hard work, self-reflection, self-improvement and achieving excellence at every level.”

The site team found the department to be compliant on all nine standards, not a routine finding. Gleason noted, “This gives us a new goal, which is to maintain our top-tier performance that makes us competitive with the other prominent programs across the country.”